4th November 2019

Children of Guardian St Kilda Makeover Graffitied Electricity Box

children wearing hats and paint smocks painting electricity box

The team at Tree House St Kilda are passionate about including the children in the wider community, so when the electricity box outside the centre was graffitied yet again, they decided to take action and transform the vandalism into a beautiful community project.

Early Childhood Teacher, Kendall, shared an overview of the project, including their designs, setbacks, and the colourful final result.

“The project began because our Centre Manager, Kate, was tired of looking at the graffitied electricity box outside our centre,” shares Kendall.

“Kate wanted it painted, and as a kindergarten teacher I saw an exciting learning opportunity that could come from the project. Then, as a centre, we got to work.”

letter to community about electricity box

 

The first step was contacting the local council to initiate the repainting of the electricity box. It was proposed that the kindergarten children would take charge of the project, from design to execution.

“The children worked collaboratively on designs for the box, pulling inspiration from what we are thankful for in our St Kilda community,” explains Kendall.

“As we share the land with the Boon Waurung people, we wanted to incorporate them into the design too. After many conversations, we decided on the botanical gardens, the beach and a street.”

With the design confirmed, the children created a flyer to notify the neighbours and community of the project, as it was required by council. They happily did a letterbox drop, sparking conversations with community members.

“During the project, we had many conversations with the children about keeping our community beautiful and clean for all,” shares Kendall.

“We unfortunately had a few setbacks, as people graffitied the box while we were trying to paint, but instead of letting it get them down, the children showed extraordinary resilience and persistence.”

The final result is a vibrant display of gardens, sea creatures, handprints and a street not unlike their own.

“The project has had so much positive feedback. The children and families love seeing it as they walk into the centre, and love to point out their designs and handprints,” says Kendall.

“We’ve also had our local school reach out to see how they can revamp their own electricity box, so people are definitely taking notice.”

Kendall and the team look forward to continuing their community projects and getting the children involved as much as possible.

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